Health

The challenge: We all deserve to reach our highest standard of health, but rates of disease and premature death remain unacceptably high across Africa and Asia. Every year, more than five million children die globally before their fifth birthday, and this risk is twice as high for children born into poverty. Risks are also high for women: the proportion of women who do not survive childbirth is 14 times higher in the developing world than it is in developed countries like Canada. To tackle these challenges and meet the global goals to improve health for all, it is estimated that 18 million more health workers are needed by 2030 worldwide.

Our solution: Working with governments, private institutions, local communities, and global experts, we invest in strong healthcare systems to ensure everyone – including marginalized groups like women and girls – can reach their highest standard of health. Our programs help people make healthy choices, and get quality care when an issue arises – even in remote areas. We promote public health awareness, training for professionals of all kinds, and improvements to a range of facilities, from basic rural clinics to specialized centres for treatment and research on a global scale.

Primary health care and the COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 has underscored the importance of primary health care systems, both in the global response to the pandemic and in keeping people healthy through the delivery of essential services.

Side effects: How COVID-19 is putting gender equality gains at risk

By Lindsay Mossman, Senior Gender Equality Advisor
How old you are, where you live, your race, your ethnic background, and your socioeconomic status all affect how your world has changed since the pandemic began. Gender is no exception.

A Canadian in Kenya

When he first heard about the coronavirus in early February, Liam Thorne was working as a monitoring and evaluation fellow supporting health programming in Kisii, Kenya.

Bridging the gap by supporting communities

Community health volunteers (CHVs) play a crucial role in the healthcare system in Kenya.

“Each of us can contribute.”

As a vaccine for COVID-19 has yet to be produced, prevention is the only way to stop the spread of this disease. Community awareness is key to the success of such initiatives.

Fighting fear and misinformation on three wheels

Thanks to COVID-19 prevention training provided by a Canadian-supported program, Maria learned that prevention was something she could help control.

When awareness spreads faster than the virus

Health leaders in northern Pakistan are using homegrown solutions to educate rural communities about COVID-19.

Dispatch from the Field: Running Water

The International Youth Fellowship program helps young Canadian professional launch careers in development by working for a host organization in Africa or Asia. The program is supported by the Government of Canada and Aga Khan Foundation Canada, through the funds raised by World Partnership Walk and Golf.

Leading the charge

Elaha Elham feels very lucky to have become a nurse. The first female in her family to complete her education,