Knowledge Centre

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Global Health & The World of Business

Global Health & The World Of Business explored how Canada’s leadership in innovative public-private partnerships has contributed to the reset of global health financing.

  • Health

Canada and the Fight to Protect all Children from Polio

Canada and the Fight to Protect all Children from Polio explored Canada’s sustained leadership supporting eradication efforts in some of the most inaccessible and conflict-affected regions in the world as well as the most difficult challenges ahead. A keynote address was delivered by Canada’s Minister of International Development, the Honourable Christian Paradis.

  • Health

Making the Grade in Global Education: Unlocking the Power of Play

AKFC and Right To Play invited people from across the country to discuss how sport and play are used to educate and empower children around the world. Unlocking the Power of Play marked the debut of AKFC’s event series, Making the Grade in Global Education. Three knowledgeable speakers gathered to discuss the effectiveness of play-based learning and shared a wide range of perspectives, from how teachers are trained to play and how child-centred learning fosters the development of a child’s language and social skills.

  • Education

Youth (Un)Employment: Global Problems Meet Local Solutions

Aga Khan Foundation Canada (AKFC) hosted a discussion between experts and practitioners working to create economic opportunities for youth. The discussion marked AKFC’s 10th University Seminar Series and was followed by an interactive workshop. Our goal? To spur important conversations on how we can create economic opportunities for youth and ensure that the voices of young people across Canada are heard in this critical global debate.

  • Economic Inclusion

Webcast: Development Finance Institutions and the Canadian Development Context

Increasingly, there have been discussions that suggest that Canada may look to create a DFI to bolster investments in emerging economies aligned with current development priorities. Speakers reviewed the current international DFI landscape, addressed key concerns and challenges from the Canadian context, and outlined what a Canadian DFI will mean for current and future development priorities.

  • Economic Inclusion

Canadian Humanitarian Conference

Aga Khan Foundation Canada, in partnership with the Humanitarian Coalition, the International Development Research Centre and the Canadian Research Institute on Humanitarian Crisis and Aid, invite you to watch a series of webcasts by renowned humanitarian experts at the second annual Canadian Humanitarian Conference. The conference was held at the Delegation of the Ismaili Imamat, Ottawa on December 4 and 5, 2014. It set the stage for a national conversation showcasing Canadian expertise in humanitarian response and related fields.

  • Environment and Climate Change
  • Health

Building Global Citizens: Educating for the 21st century

Is “global citizenship education” just a new buzzword or a concept that is transforming education policies, approaches, and, ultimately, the dynamic between developed and developing countries? Listen to Ms. Choi, Director, Division for Teaching, Learning and Content, of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization’s (UNESCO) keynote address, and the Q&A session on how global citizenship education is being defined, put into action, and measured.

  • Education

Roshan: Canada’s Legacy in Afghanistan

In 2003, when the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development established the Afghanistan mobile company Roshan, there was virtually no telecommunications infrastructure in the country. Some Afghans actually had to walk to a neighbouring country to make a phone call. Today, Roshan’s 1,000 towers reach more than six million subscribers. Spur and Aga Khan Foundation Canada invited Roshan CEO and Canadian native Karim Khoja to a discussion of the mobile tech sector in Afghanistan. The event was moderated by May Jeong, an award-winning freelance writer based in Afghanistan.

  • Economic Inclusion

Measuring Development Impact: Can Randomized Control Trials transform development?

Measuring the true impact of social policies and programs is a significant challenge for the development sector. Over the last decade, researchers and policymakers have increasingly used Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) to measure the impact of development programs to understand if a program is achieving its intended results. Watch Iqbal Dhaliwal, Deputy Director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab’s (J-PAL) presentation, “Can Randomized Control Trials transform development?” to learn more about RCTs, when they should be used, what questions they can answer, and how the connect to key trends in international social experiments.

  • Measuring Development Impact

Digital Dividends: Launch of the 2016 World Development Report

Rapid innovations in digital technology have the potential to profoundly affect the lives of billions of people, through better access to digital devices and the Internet. Increased connectivity is sparking new opportunities for inclusion, efficiency, and innovation, but the broader benefits of the digital revolution may still be on the horizon. The World Bank’s 2016 World Development Report, Digital Dividends, explores how development actors can harness digital technologies to improve the lives of the world’s poorest.

  • Civil Society
  • Economic Inclusion
  • Education
  • Health

The Social Observatory: Adaptive Learning in Development Projects

“Scaling-Up” is one of the biggest challenges in development. Interventions that work well with small populations routinely face challenges in expanding to a larger number of communities. Such projects hinge upon their adaptive capacity —the ability to be nimble, to learn by doing, and to make mid-course corrections in management and design—in order to be effective. Vijayendra Rao, Lead Economist, The World Bank, discusses the Social Observatory, an interdisciplinary approach to improve development impact.

  • Measuring Development Impact

Continuing the RCT conversation: Assessing the evidence from Randomized Evaluations of Economic Interventions in Health

Randomized controlled trials have long been used in medicine and public health. In recent decades, development economists have adopted this rigorous evaluation methodology to test interventions in many sectors. Thomas Chupein of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) discusses the evidence and policy lessons that have emerged from more than 150 health evaluations conducted by J-PAL affiliated researchers.

  • Measuring Development Impact

Embracing Complexity: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Development and Humanitarian Assistance

How do we know what works in development? In crisis or conflict situations, how do we determine the effectiveness of humanitarian interventions? Dr. Jyotsna (Jo) Puri, Deputy Executive Director and Head of Evaluation, International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie) explores the evidence on what is working, how and for whom, in both development and crisis situations.

  • Measuring Development Impact

How FinTech can tackle global poverty

Bank accounts. Credit cards. Loans. For more than two billion people around the world, these basic financial tools are out of reach.

But innovations in financial technology – or FinTech – have the potential to break the cycle of poverty. Learn how new technologies at the forefront of the FinTech revolution, such as mobile banking, can unlock new opportunities for the world’s poor, by providing access to new markets and promoting financial inclusion.

  • Economic Inclusion

Cautionary tales of complex causation: Qualitative and mixed method impact assessment of climate change and livelihood transformations in Africa

We have a treasure chest of qualitative methods to draw upon in assessing multiple contributions to social and development goals. These include realist evaluation, contribution analysis, process tracing and participatory learning and action. But weak incentives and poor practice can easily undermine their credibility and cost-effectiveness.

This is the fifth event of our series Measuring Development Impact with Professor James Copestake from the University of Bath. Dr. Copestake’s research takes a fresh, empirically grounded look at how we can strengthen qualitative and mixed method impact evaluation by benchmarking different methods against each other. Dr. Copestake draws upon his own action research into the complex causal attribution problems arising from climate change and livelihood transformations in Ethiopia and Malawi.

  • Measuring Development Impact

Enhancing Youth potential in Northern Pakistan

A new generation of leaders is taking shape in Northern Pakistan, thanks to a Canadian-sponsored program that is fostering new approaches to engaging youth in the social and economic life of their communities. With amazing results. Enhancing Employability and Leadership for Youth (EELY) focused its efforts on skills and leadership training for youth in the Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral regions in Northern Pakistan. Recent regional elections saw a large number of youth who participated in the training, elected to village councils.

  • Economic Inclusion

eHealth Initiatives Saving Time, Money and Lives

In the past decade, strengthening health care services in developing countries has been bolstered by technology. A big part of those advancements has been the result of eHealth, which utilizes communications technologies to create better access to services and provides opportunities for knowledge sharing among healthcare professionals.

These advancements are saving time, money, and most importantly, lives. Rural communities in particular are benefiting.

  • Health